THEME BY MARAUDERSMAPS
i'm an illustrator, concept artist, cosplayer, and nerd with a penchant for femininity and love of all things childish. this tumblr mostly consists of art, cute things, fandom stuff, costumes, and feminism.

laylainalaska:

fuckyeahsources:

Nope. But the real story is better. Bolding mine:

The late Ruth Thompson, a cell painter on “Snow White” who later became a multiplane scene planner, recalled: “We tried everything - airbrush, drybrush, even lipstick and rouge, which is perhaps the basis for the legend because we did, in fact, try it. But nothing worked.

The airbrush was difficult to control on such a small area; drybrush was too harsh; lipstick and rouge unwieldy and messy. Everything proved to be impractical and all hope seemed lost to give Snow White her little bit of color when the idea of using a dye was proposed.

Again Ms. Thompson: “Someone suggested a red dye because the blue day we added to give Donald Duck his distinctive sailor-blue never really could be washed off the cell without leaving a bluish stain where the paint had been applied.”

Ever since the mid 30’s when color became the norm for all the cartoons, not just the “Silly Symphonies,” all paints and inks were made at the studio. During this period as well cells were routinely reused for economic reasons, thus the need to wash them off. Apparently Donald’s special blue color was made with a dye added to the usual powdered pigments. “So we tried that.” As the women gathered around in what must have seemed just another dead-end effort, all eyes became fixed on the red dot which soon became a small glow with no perceptible edge. The hushed silence soon gave way to sighs of relief. The method had finally been found. Now the application.

Among the studio’s many inkers (an extremely demanding profession), was one young lady whose training and skill was unique: Helen Ogger. Just being an inker placed one within the elite confines of this most “holy of holies” area of the Nunnery, as the Ink and Paint Department was so called (Walt had strict and quite Victorian views that the sexes not mingle at the workplace, allowing no male personnel save the “gofer” boy and the paymaster “Mr.” Keener to enter this domain of mostly unmarried women ). But Helen was in addition a very fine cartoonist and one of the few women at Disney’s or anywhere else, who could animate.

Such a seemingly insignificant detail (as the cheek colors) might be thought not worthy of special mention (she, as well as the other inkers and painters, was given no screen credit). But when one adds up the number of footage required to be tinted freehand on each individual cell, the hours suddenly turn into weeks and months. In fact, such a treatment was never attempted again on such a scale and even today, the publicity stills from “Snow White,” most of which do not have the added blush, bear witness to how that little touch of extra care adds to the vitality we see on the screen.

The work was done on all close-ups, most medium shots, and even on some long shots. The Queen was also similarly tinted. Hundreds of hours were needed to complete this task, arduous, repetitive and, of course, hard on the eyes. Ultimately a handful of other girls were needed to assist Helen as the clocked ticked toward the deadline.

Helen had to place several cells together on an animation board, one atop the other, just like in the process of animation, in order to get the ‘registration’ right (the spot of red just right in relation to the preceding and following ones) - all of this without any guide. She would work out her own extremes and then ‘animate’ the blush in inbetweens. Her work deserves admiration and gratitude and it is unfortunate that her contribution has remained unknown and her anonymity unaltered during her lifetime. She was paid, as were the rest of the Inkers, $18 a week, which included a half-day on Saturday and the many, many hours of unpaid overtime “Snow White” would require - all given unstintingly, (by everyone involved, it should be added), to a project whose joy in participating was its own reward.

She eventually became head of Inking and Special Effects and even taught classes in animation at the studio. She left in 1941 (apparently part of the terrible strike that would leave the Disney Studio changed forever), taking her skills with her. She died in Glendale in February of 1980. Perhaps it is safe to say that her departure was critical to the abrupt demise of this now unique effect (it was also used, though on a much smaller scale in both “Pinocchio” and “Fantasia”). None of the other inkers or painters were animators and it is this fact, not just the factor of economy nor the changing tastes, which surely must be considered a reason why such details were never attempted again. The golden age was over.

Also, here’s an interesting article about female cel painters at Disney. I am now fascinated by the idea of writing something with a Depression-era cel painter as a protagonist.

rufftoon:

From the Animation Scoop website :

On September 24th, Shout! Factory will theatrically release the animated feature Jack and the Cuckoo Clock Heart in theaters across the U.S.. The film will play on the big screen Los Angeles, San Francisco, Scottsdale, Denver, Atlanta, Detroit, Houston, Miami, Orlando and Tampa, Florida.

For the rest of the article: http://blogs.indiewire.com/animationscoop/trailer-shout-factorys-jack-and-the-cockoo-clock-heart-20140808

nappynomad:

lyndez:

peopleofmotorcity:

This is the first peek at the new Disney show “Star vs The Forces of Evil”

It’s created Daron Nefcy, who is only the second lady ever to get a show on Disney.  She also just happens to be my old college house mate!  She was working on this show all the way back when we lived together, I can’t tell you how exciting it is to see it become a reality!!

So yeah, Jump on this bandwagon with me!!

This looks so good!!

You know, I feel that even though Cartoon Network shuns girls for the most part from watching it’s cartoons, Disney tends to embrace. I enjoy that.

Anonymous:  too bad you dont understand that SMC does not have the budget that the original series had becuase it's only being broadcasted on the internet, therefore they're not getting any TV sponsoring. if the animation is really that awful for you then you probably shouldn't be subjecting yourself to anymore torture. Toei is doing what they can with what they've got and I wish more people like you would understand that.

thesanityclause:

damnitfeelsgoodtobeafangirl:

thesanityclause:

No, I understand. Here’s what you don’t understand: Number one, I don’t buy that one of the biggest anime companies in the world doesn’t have the money to put down a decent budget for one of the biggest name animes in the world. Second, you’re confusing budget with quality. The problem SMC is having is poor drawings (KEYFRAMES not just inbetweens, although even inbetweens should be a much higher quality than what is displayed here), characters flying off model, as well as limited expressions and clean movements. You don’t need a massive budget to make a good show, you need careful, devoted directors and animators. So far, I’m seeing sloppy keyframes and movements that I would expect out of a college level student. And for something like Sailor Moon, this is unacceptable.

An art product shouldn’t be viewed with “Oh well I guess they tried their hardest even if it is bad!” No, if it’s shit, it’s shit. That’s how the business goes. No one gives you a pass just because you tried your best. 

So yes, I will keep watching it, if just because now I’m more amused than disappointed by all the fantastic errors and poor drawings, and also because hey I really love Sailor Moon. And I have the slightest sliver of hope that maybe they changed key animators during the course of its run and we’ll see an improvement.

I hope people know when they try to talk this kinda nonsense at someone who is actively responding to them from an animation studio is being mocked by by ALL their co-workers as well.

As someone who is still giving SMC as much of my hope as positive…I’ll just add my two cents that their issues exist outside of budget issues. Despite what people want to believe, budget does NOT equal quality. Take a gander at Disney’s dark ages. Their budget was shit, they were tracing drawings and taking every short cut but they had solid drawings. Or hell! Look at huge budget movies like Frozen that everyone likes to complain about? They had serious money behind Frozen! Why was the character animation and texturing kinda meh in that movie then? Why were the designs bland? Why was the script weak? They had money, right?? Throwing money at something doesn’t default that the product will be the best thing you’ve ever seen in your life. Budget =/= Quality

Also it’s totally fair to enjoy something and point out it’s flaws. I enjoy Frozen and SMC both..but I will %100 point out when it’s a disappointment and full of shit.

One of my favorite coworkers laying down some truths.

pabster:

Havent seen a lot of noise about the latest controversy in the animation industry over here.. If anyone should care the most about this animation wage fixing issue, is you: The young, upcoming talented artists going into the field. You should care. This will affect you the most down the road whether you want it or not.

/rant over.

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anatomicalart:

Quickest way to improvement? Practice. It’s a simple bit of advice that rings with absolute truth. Articles, tips, mentors, and study will never get you as far as rolling up your sleeves and getting down to work, be it animation or any other skill. Today we’ve compiled a list of exercises, like animation push-ups, that will get your art skills buff and toned.

Maybe you still need convinced of how important the “Art of Doing” is? Look no further than the early days of animation, especially at the Disney studio. Here were a group of animators (before being an animator was even a thing) who HAD no books to read, or websites to visit, or even experienced animators to ask. They learned via the age old art of hands-on training, experimenting and discovering as they went. And some would argue they created some of the greatest animation to ever be seen. Masterpieces like the dwarfs dancing in Snow White or the terror of the Monstro scene in Pinocchio. So be like them! Get out there and do animation!

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Some of these exercises you may have done or seen before; some maybe not. Consider doing each of them, even if you did once previously, because returning to an old exercise to see how much you’ve progressed is a very valuable experience.

Level 1 Exercises

(Do not discount their simplicity! Here you have the principals of animation, which all other animation is built on. They are worth your time and effort.)

  1. Ball Bouncing in place, no decay (loop)
  2. Ball Bouncing across the screen
  3. Brick falling from a shelf onto the ground
  4. Simple character head turn
  5. Character head turn with anticipation
  6. Character blinking
  7. Character thinking [tougher than it sounds!]
  8. Flour Sack waving (loop)
  9. Flour Sack jumping
  10. Flour Sack falling (loop or hitting the ground)
  11. Flour Sack kicking a ball
Level 2 Exercises
  1. Change in Character emotion (happy to sad, sad to angry, etc.)
  2. Character jumping over a gap
  3. Standing up (from a chair)
  4. Walk Cycle [oldie but goodie!]
  5. Character on a pogo stick (loop)
  6. Laughing
  7. Sneezing
  8. Reaching for an object on a shelf overhead
  9. Quick motion smear/blur
  10. Taking a deep breath [also tougher than it sounds!]
  11. A tree falling
  12. Character being hit by something simple (ball, brick, book)
  13. Run Cycle
Level 3 Exercises
  1. Close up of open hand closing into fist
  2. Close up of hand picking up a small object
  3. Character lifting a heavy object (with purpose!)
  4. Overlapping action (puffy hair, floppy ears, tail)
  5. Character painting
  6. Hammering a nail
  7. Stirring a soup pot and tasting from a spoon
  8. Character blowing up a balloon
  9. Character juggling (loop)
  10. Scared character peering around a corner
  11. Zipping up a jacket
  12. Licking and sealing an envelope
  13. Standing up (from the ground)
  14. Pressing an elevator button and waiting for it
  15. Starting to say something but unsure of how
Level 4 Exercises
  1. Character eating a cupcake
  2. Object falling into a body of water
  3. Two characters playing tug-of-war
  4. Character dealing a deck of cards out
  5. The full process of brushing one’s teeth
  6. A single piece of paper dropping through the air
  7. Run across screen with change in direction
  8. Sleeping character startled by alarm then returning to sleepy state
  9. Opening a cupboard and removing something inside
  10. Putting on a pair of pants
  11. Opening the “world’s best gift” and reacting
  12. Any of the above exercises using a very heavy character/object next to a very light character/object. Enhance the differences the weight change makes!
Things to keep in mind:
  • Reading these exercises will do as much for you as reading about push-ups would do for your physical muscles: NOTHING. If you want the benefit, you must animate them. Take a deep breath and just do it.
  • Do not forget the famous words of Ollie Johnston: “You’re not supposed to animate drawings [3D models]. You’re supposed to animate feelings.” If a character isn’t thinking, they aren’t alive, and the animation has failed.
  • Keep it simple! There is no reason to over complicate any of these exercises. Going back to push-ups, would push-ups be harder if while doing them you also recited the Gettysburg Address? Yes. Would they be any more beneficial? No. Keep things nice and simple and clear.
  • Do your best. There is no reason to do these exercises poorly. Give it your all. You don’t have to show anyone, these are for you. You owe it to yourself to try your very best. Something not quite right? Take the time to fix it.
  • As always, have fun. Push ups are not fun. Animation is supposed to be. Be joyful in your work!

Have any questions about the exercises above? Leave a comment below and we’ll answer them the best we can! Someone else may be wondering the exact same thing, so you’ll help them too. Likewise if someone is looking for possible exercises, why not share a link to these and give them a hand?

Article featured on AnimatorIsland.com 
[Source]
Article composed by J.K. RIKI
MARCH 18, 2013
Follow @AnimatorIsland on Twitter for more updates tips and tricks.

eternity-in-ice:  What exactly is the difference between the Pixar and Disney animations studios these days? Are they completely separate? Or collaborating on a lot of things? They seem to be at the same level of CGI (and storytelling skills) in all the recent movies, but I'm curious.

nooby-banana:

Pixar is owned by Disney, but that’s the extent of their collaboration. Perhaps Disney marketing execs have a bit of say at Pixar, but for the most part they are completely different studios. Pixar is near San Francisco, Disney is in Burbank. Completely different set of people.

(i said this as a comment, but then i figured it merited a reblog for clarification if anyone else is confused)

to be more specific, the walt disney company owns both walt disney animation and pixar animation studios. the disney company has many facets and entities that they own located in many places (including theme parks!), whereas disney animation is literally just the animation studio located in burbank.

blindsprings:

kwonshell:

Jinxy Jenkins, Lucky Lou

Me and Mike Bidinger’s thesis film made during our years at Ringling. Please enjoy and share! :)

I loved this SO MUCH!! I love the concept art so I’m so glad to see the full short!
SO SO SO SO SO GOOD!!!

lescheveuxoranges:

adrien-gromelle:

Busted from Adrien on Vimeo (with the sound).


Fan art animation I did for fun and for free as a tribute to Aladdin & Tangled.

My dear Adrien has finally finished his short animation! Go and see it! It’s beautiful!

princesshorseface:

gg-rain:

hophigh:

YOU GUYS TURN ON THE SUBTITLES

AHH I NEED A MINUTE

OH MY GOD OH MY GOD A GAY GHIBLI MOVIE OH MY GOD

A GAY GHIBLI MOVIE! 

katsallday:

ca-tsuka:

moonanimate:

Enjoy. :)

"Moon Animate Make Up" = Sailor Moon episode 38 re-animated by over 200 fans from all around the world.

Wow! This was incredible! Excellent job to all the amazing animators involved!

emmyc:

wannabeanimator:

The Boxtrolls (2014) | Behind the Scenes

via Animation Magazine:

  • 1 week; the average amount of time for an animator to complete 3.7 seconds of footage
  • 3.5 inches, the cuff-to-cuff measurement of baby Eggs’ sweater (created on an embroidery machine to produce irregular lines, like a hand-knitted garment). His little socks are only ⅝” long
  • 4 scenes per week was the goal for each animator
  • 14 different fabrics were used in Lord Portley-Rind’s white hat
  • 24 kinds of weeds were created for backgrounds by the greens department
  • 55 different sculpts of prop cheeses were made; different scale sizes were needed for wide, medium and close shots

The 7th image… oh man..how do they animate water so that the wave lights animate alongside the character animation?? Is that some 3D printed water right there that they switch out over and over??? A light projection thru glass? Dying to know how it works. Everything about how Laika makes movies is real actual magic