THEME BY MARAUDERSMAPS
i'm an illustrator, concept artist, cosplayer, and nerd with a penchant for femininity and love of all things childish. this tumblr mostly consists of art, cute things, fandom stuff, costumes, and feminism.
HARRY POTTER SPELLS: a summary

when an unlocking spell is one of the most basic spells you can learn at hogwarts, i really wonder why they bother even locking anything without also enchanting the lock to be alohomora-proof.

# hp  

rebelwithoutabroom:

Harry Potter AU in which Remus Lupin doesn’t leave Hogwarts after Snape tells everyone he’s a werewolf

instead, he fucking stays where he belongs

and, as the howlers start coming, insults exploding at the teacher’s table every morning like clockwork, the students take notice. They see Lupin’s face, and he’s not even angry, he looks fucking resigned to it, like he deserves it.

So, the students take matters into their own hands. 

"You’re the best teacher EVER" is heard on a Monday morning, followed by a “We really like your classes” on Tuesday and “Thanks for being such a cool guy. AND FOR THE CHOCOLATES” on Wednesday.

by Friday, things have escalated to the point that you can’t  go ten minutes without a howler bursting and showering Lupin in compliments.

(It’s a whole month before the fateful “YOU HAVE A VERY CUTE ASS, 10/10 WOULD BANG! ” and the subsequent banning of all howlers for the teachers.

Snape has never looked more constipated in his life.)

hypable:

Fifteen-year-old Cassidy Stay made headlines last month when she quoted Albus Dumbledore at her family’s memorial, and now a report suggests J.K. Rowling responded in the best way possible.
On July 9, Stay’s uncle shot her mother, father, and four younger siblings when he entered their home and wasn’t given the location of his ex-wife. Stay was the only survivor of the shooting because she reportedly played dead after a bullet hit her finger and grazed her skull.
At the memorial service three days after the horrific incident, Stay gave a speech and quoted Dumbledore in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. “‘Happiness can be found even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light,’” she said to an audience of supporters. “I know that my mom, dad, Bryan, Emily, Becca and Zach are in a much better place and that I’ll be able to see them again one day.”
Read Rowling’s response at Hypable.com

hypable:

Fifteen-year-old Cassidy Stay made headlines last month when she quoted Albus Dumbledore at her family’s memorial, and now a report suggests J.K. Rowling responded in the best way possible.

On July 9, Stay’s uncle shot her mother, father, and four younger siblings when he entered their home and wasn’t given the location of his ex-wife. Stay was the only survivor of the shooting because she reportedly played dead after a bullet hit her finger and grazed her skull.

At the memorial service three days after the horrific incident, Stay gave a speech and quoted Dumbledore in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. “‘Happiness can be found even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light,’” she said to an audience of supporters. “I know that my mom, dad, Bryan, Emily, Becca and Zach are in a much better place and that I’ll be able to see them again one day.”

Read Rowling’s response at Hypable.com

wolveswithhats:

toughtink:

wolveswithhats:

it’s true that the house system can be very divisive, but at the same time most fans have embraced a certain house and seem to really love that they can “belong” to it, so i imagine the reaction is much the same within the book universe.

I don’t deny that there is a definite sense of “house pride” both in-universe and out, and do like the idea of embracing a team/family so everyone has a place. What bothers me is that the houses are based on quality of character, and determined as such as very young children. Those teen years are very, very important in shaping the type of people these kids will grow into, so if they’re placed in a house based on certain values, it’s naturally going to have a chameleon effect and they’re going to adhere to it. There’s no doubt that some of these kids most definitely do possess these traits and will befriend those will similiar qualities anyway, but it seems much healthier to let them sort their own identities instead of labeling and segregrating them as children. Cliques can and will happen, but the idea that the school itself encourages them is so messed up to me.

You could say that I’m reading way too much into the child psychology aspect and that the Sorting Hat is psychic and just knows, but the idea of pre-destiny is equally scary to me. “you have no say in who you’re going to be, kids. you can and will be ambitious and cruel.”

I guess if they’re going to separate by house, I’d rather it be based on something more arbitrary than virtues and let them figure it out on their own.

within the book universe, i always sort of assumed that the sorting hat sorted based not only on qualities students currently have or currently value, but what it knows they will come to be. for example, neville showed a bit of bravery in his first year, but i get the feeling that the sorting hat might have known what neville would be in his seventh year and sorted him accordingly (or maybe he just wasn’t a good enough finder for hufflepuff lol).

i would also argue that normal, real-world schooling has a tendency to automatically divide students in much the same way, sometimes based on hobbies (band geeks, cheerleaders, jocks, etc), sometimes completely randomly (homeroom), and sometimes based on academic level (honors/gifted classes vs normal vs remedial), and cliques form accordingly. personally, i found more friends in the circles regarding the things that i valued (based on hobbies or academia) than in the randomly thrown together groups.

i don’t even really know what i’m arguing, but it’s an interesting conversation to me. it seems like most criticisms of the house system stems from the books’ views of slytherin as the “bad” house, and taking until book 7 to finally show that not ALL slytherins are secretly evil, which is a super valid complaint.

(I don’t know what I’m arguing either, ha ha)

I think the difference being with real world division is that it’s mostly voluntary choice? Excepting parents forcing their kids into extracurricular activities, students generally choose to pursue these activities themselves based on their existing hobbies. Cliques still form, sometimes unfairly, but it’s still based on personal preferences. I think that’s what mostly bothers me, is that I feel like the element of individuality is stripped away and cliques are pre-established based on mostly subconscious traits. It’d be interesting to see what would happen if they implemented this sort of virtue-based housing system in a real world boarding school.

As for the book seven Slytherins, I swear I remember during the final battle JK wrote something about how all the Gryffindors stayed, most of the Hufflepuffs, some of the Ravenclaws and almost none of the Slytherins? Save for like, Draco, but it was less of a noble choice and more so something to do with his parents? God, I can barely remember anything in those books outside of The Golden Trio Go Camping and Neville Is (Or Totally Should Be) The Real Hero. Does something specific occur that shows that some of the Slytherins are actually decent?

(random, but I thought I remember them saying that every evil wizard came from Slytherin, but then there’s Peter (actually evil) and Sirius (thought to be evil) who were both Gryffindor? Am I remembering that bit correctly? I always thought it’d be more interesting if the Mauraders all came from the four different houses instead of just one, or would have liked to see more breakdown of the structuring of the houses with characters like Peter who don’t really fit the mold.)

that’s true about the picking it yourself vs it being picked for you. i mean, they say the sorting hat takes into consideration the wearer’s preference but that doesn’t equate to choosing your own house.

also, on the “all evil wizards come out of slytherin” thing, i think that was said by like…first year ron, i think?? a lot of readers (especially at the time) took that to mean it was literally canon, but i assume now, looking back on it, it’s more of a way to show that character’s prejudice and misinformation. all four of the mauraders were in gryffindor, despite wormtail being a complete horse-shit human being (he did look up to the confidence and charisma of his fellow gryffindors, so maybe that’s how?). i imagine it’s not hard for the general public to look at a good person who’s supposedly done something evil (sirius) and kind of misremember what house he was in according to what they assume of each house. “no he couldn’t have been in gryffindor, you’re remembering wrong. he was always a slytherin just like the rest of his family, right?” that sort of thing, which of course furthers the stereotype for slytherin.

it would have been nice if the point of gryffindor=/=good, slytherin=/=evil had been discussed more openly in the books.

# hp  

wolveswithhats:

it’s true that the house system can be very divisive, but at the same time most fans have embraced a certain house and seem to really love that they can “belong” to it, so i imagine the reaction is much the same within the book universe.

I don’t deny that there is a definite sense of “house pride” both in-universe and out, and do like the idea of embracing a team/family so everyone has a place. What bothers me is that the houses are based on quality of character, and determined as such as very young children. Those teen years are very, very important in shaping the type of people these kids will grow into, so if they’re placed in a house based on certain values, it’s naturally going to have a chameleon effect and they’re going to adhere to it. There’s no doubt that some of these kids most definitely do possess these traits and will befriend those will similiar qualities anyway, but it seems much healthier to let them sort their own identities instead of labeling and segregrating them as children. Cliques can and will happen, but the idea that the school itself encourages them is so messed up to me.

You could say that I’m reading way too much into the child psychology aspect and that the Sorting Hat is psychic and just knows, but the idea of pre-destiny is equally scary to me. “you have no say in who you’re going to be, kids. you can and will be ambitious and cruel.”

I guess if they’re going to separate by house, I’d rather it be based on something more arbitrary than virtues and let them figure it out on their own.

within the book universe, i always sort of assumed that the sorting hat sorted based not only on qualities students currently have or currently value, but what it knows they will come to be. for example, neville showed a bit of bravery in his first year, but i get the feeling that the sorting hat might have known what neville would be in his seventh year and sorted him accordingly (or maybe he just wasn’t a good enough finder for hufflepuff lol).

i would also argue that normal, real-world schooling has a tendency to automatically divide students in much the same way, sometimes based on hobbies (band geeks, cheerleaders, jocks, etc), sometimes completely randomly (homeroom), and sometimes based on academic level (honors/gifted classes vs normal vs remedial), and cliques form accordingly. personally, i found more friends in the circles regarding the things that i valued (based on hobbies or academia) than in the randomly thrown together groups.

i don’t even really know what i’m arguing, but it’s an interesting conversation to me. it seems like most criticisms of the house system stems from the books’ views of slytherin as the “bad” house, and taking until book 7 to finally show that not ALL slytherins are secretly evil, which is a super valid complaint.

missveryvery:

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

pothepolarbear:

Some people still think Beauxbatons was for girls and Durmstrang was for boys.

THANK YOU

image

image

gee i wonder why

damn movies got everything wrong constantly. may i remind you all this is the same movie where they decided to take out all the awesome monsters and crazy spells they had to get past in the final task for the triwizard tournament in favor of a hedge maze that eats people.

jailbaitvstheworld:

Alright so. J.K. Rowling said that there’s around 1,000 students at Hogwarts at a time.

1,000 students divided by 4 houses means around 250 students in a house at a time on average.

250 students in a house divided by 7 years means about 36 students in a class per house.

WHICH MEEEEAAAANS about 143 students entering in/graduating per year at Hogwarts.

Not many people.

(I only did this because I was listening to Harry Potter again and it seemed there weren’t many people in Harry’s year in Gryffindor. MATHEMATICAL!)

thatsmallbluebox:

guys

on september 1st 2017 we should all go to King’s Cross station and be there for the end of Harry Potter’s timeline 

hug-a-mermaid:

Favorite Muggleborns headcanons (1/?)

# hp  # yes  
The moment when Harry takes Draco's wand
J. K. Rowling: I said to Arthur, my American editor - we had an interesting conversation during the editing of seven - the moment when Harry takes Draco's wand, Arthur said, God, that's the moment when the ownership of the Elder wand is actually transferred? And I said, that's right. He said, shouldn't that be a bit more dramatic? And I said, no, not at all, the reverse. I said to Arthur, I think it really puts the elaborate, grandiose plans of Dumbledore and Voldemort in their place. That actually the history of the wizarding world hinged on two teenage boys wrestling with each other. They weren't even using magic. It became an ugly little corner tussle for the possession of wands. And I really liked that - that very human moment, as opposed to these two wizards who were twitching strings and manipulating and implanting information and husbanding information and guarding information, you know? Ultimately it just came down to that, a little scuffle and fistfight in the corner and pulling a wand away.
Melissa Anelli: It says a lot about the world at large, I think, about conflict in the world, it's these little things -
J. K. Rowing: And the difference one individual can make. Always, the difference one individual can make.

frankenbolt:

image

marchingthroughthetardis replied to your post: I really wish she would stop.

I don’t know what’s going on but okay?

I read this morning JK is writing a short with Harry as a 37 year old man. This on top of her shitting all over Ron/Hermione is just making really salty dude.

Totally full of the Vinegar. 

My feelings are that she should just, let the body of work stand for what it is, anything additional is just overkill. I’m done with Harry, let me know more about the Magical world outside of Hogwarts. What’s going on elsewhere? I wanna know more about other wizarding schools, come on. 

but she didn’t shit all over ron/hermione. she said that the reason they ended up together was more wish fulfillment for herself than for any particular plot reason and that maybe hermione may have worked out with harry if she had given it a chance.

i listened to a podcast forever ago about how misconstrued her words were for that particular interview, taken completely out of context and the meaning changed. of course i can’t find the podcast now, but she never undid canon nor did she say that she wanted to.

beepony:

alicia-mb:

Just one of those things that I always wondered about. Stags and otters are all very well, but what if you end up with a tiny chameleon or giant blue whale? I mean, it could be a giant tub of nutella…

Anyway, so glad I got around to doing this pic -drawing the less attractive animals was awesome.

Popped it up on Redbubble because they have tote bags and cushions now which is just wow - can grab it also on cards or posters - check it out here!

magikarp tho

desidere:

desidere:

i mean i guess if u think about it technically harry potter is drift compatible with voldemort 

i’m still stuck on this